March 8, 2016   By Kelly Bejelly

Gluten free buttermilk pancakes - A Girl Worth Saving

Pancakes bring back fond memories of childhood Saturday mornings. With just a little bit of sausage on the side and a hearty drizzling of maple syrup, they were breakfast heaven. If you’ve been missing pancakes after going gluten-free, then you’ll love these gluten-free buttermilk pancakes.

I’m a big pancake fan and I’ll eat just about anything from chocolate chip to fruit pancakes. Growing up, my pancakes came from a box though, and fake maple syrup was poured from a plastic Aunt Jemima bottle. All that white flour and sugar tasted good at the time, but now that we’re eating real, whole foods, I don’t miss the box at all.

Gluten-free buttermilk pancakes

These pancakes use sweet white sorghum flour instead of my usual standby of rice flour. This lends a slight sweetness to the dough, without adding gluten. Sorghum is also high in iron, phosphorous, and potassium for an added nutritional punch.

And of course, you can’t have buttermilk pancakes without the buttermilk. Traditionally, buttermilk is the sour liquid that’s left after churning butter. The stuff you find at the grocery store though is nothing more than artificially thickened and flavored milk.

Making your own

It’s beyond simple to make your own buttermilk, but if you don’t have the time then check your local health food store. A co-op or farmer’s market nearby may have some real buttermilk too.

If you’re up for making your own, it literally takes seconds to churn raw, pastured cream into butter in the blender. Simply strain the remaining liquid off and you’ve got fresh buttermilk!

Gluten free buttermilk pancakes - A Girl Worth Saving

You can jazz these pancakes up with whatever you like. Fruit, nuts and chocolate chips can all go into the batter. My husband’s favorite thing is when I put sliced sausage into the pancakes for an all in one sausage and pancake breakfast. I’m more of a purist and prefer to have my pancakes plain and simple, but with a tantalizing fruit sauce. However you like to eat your pancakes though, these gluten-free buttermilk pancakes will be a crowd pleaser!

Gluten free buttermilk pancakes - A Girl Worth Saving

Gluten-Free Buttermilk Pancakes

Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Servings: 10
Author: Jamie Larrison @ A Girl Worth Saving
These pancakes are thick and fluffy and the perfect carrier for a hearty pat of butter and drizzle of maple syrup.
Print

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sorghum flour
  • ¼ cup arrowroot starch
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ - ¾ cup water
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil or butter
  • 2 Tbsps honey
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat a well greased cast iron skillet over medium heat.
  2. In a mixing bowl combine all of the dry ingredients and mix until incorporated.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients, starting with just 1/2 cup of water and mix just until thoroughly combined.
  4. Add the rest of the water if needed. You want the batter to be on the thick side, but still pourable. This really depends on how thick your buttermilk is. The kind I used was on the thin side so I needed less water.
  5. Using a 1/3 measuring cup pour the batter into the hot skillet. Cook until the top starts to look dry, then flip and cook for an additional minute.
  6. Best served warm

Leave A Reply

4 Comments

  • Joy
    August 19, 2016 at 2:49 pm

    These do not work with aquafaba. I’m allergic to eggs and prefer from scratch recipes but this was a miss for me. Saved by maple syrup and my 5yr old liked them even without the maple.

    • November 13, 2016 at 4:56 pm

      Sorry it wasn’t your favorite Joy!

  • Angela
    February 2, 2017 at 9:11 am

    Hi Kelli,
    I am so excited to find this buttermilk pancake recipe!!
    I am eating grass free (no wheat, barley, rye, corn, oats, rice, etc), do you know a good substitute for the sorghum flour?
    I have tried another recipe using coconut flour, while it takes good, it also takes like coconut and is a bit grainy.