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How to Get Your House Ready for a New Dog

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Last Updated on June 15, 2021

As the weather starts to get nicer, you may be thinking about how nice it would be to have a dog around to take for walks, cuddle with, and just have around. However, it's a good idea to take a few precautions to ensure that you're getting ready for a dog to be in your house. Here are a few ways that you can get your house ready for a new pup!

As the weather starts to get nicer, you may be thinking about how nice it would be to have a dog around to take for walks, cuddle with, and just have around. However, it’s a good idea to take a few precautions to ensure that you’re getting ready for a dog to be in your house. Here are a few ways that you can get your house ready for a new pup!

Make Sure No One Is Allergic

The first step in making sure that your home and household are ready for a dog is to make sure that no one has a dog allergy. If you have children, make sure to get an allergy test if you suspect a dog allergy. 93% of kids have gone to a doctor in the last 12 months, so make sure that for their next visit you bring up any possible allergy as a concern. If you live with apartmentmates, housemates, or roommates, make sure that you bring up any plans to get a dog not only as a courtesy but to ensure no one has an allergy. If someone does have a dog allergy, you can still get a pup, but you’ll have to make sure you get a hypoallergenic breed.

Make Sure You Have All the Supplies You Need

Getting a dog means getting things to make sure that you can take care of your dog from the second it walks out of the animal rescue, adoption center, or breeder’s home. You should be prepared to put at least $100 into the initial investment in supplies for your dog, and it could be even more. Here are some of the basics that you should get before you pick up your new dog:

  • Poop Bags. Buying them in bulk is usually a cheaper option and over time you’ll use them all.
  • Collar and Tags. It’s important that you get a collar and dog tags for your dog as soon as you can in case your new dog gets loose and can’t find its way back to you.
  • A Leash. A retractable leash is good for a more hyperactive dog, but a classic leash is also good for a lot of dogs.
  • A Harness. Collars can choke your dog if they have a tendency to pull on their leash, and a harness can help them not be actively injured when they pull while still restraining them.
  • A Coat (Depending on the Weather and Breed). If it’s the dead of winter and you’re adopting a husky or Malamute, you may not need to buy your dog a coat, but other breeds don’t do as well in cold weather.
  • Dog Food. This is a classic necessity. Check with the place that you’re adopting your dog from to see what kind of food your dog is used to eating.
  • Food and Water Bowls. Another classic. These come in many different styles, so you can go for whatever fits best with your budget, needs, and style.
  • Treats! You’ll want to reward your dog for good behavior and just for being a little cutie, so treats are a must-have.
  • A Bed. Giving your dog their own bed can help them with the adjustment to a new home.
  • A Crate. If your dog needs or is used to a crate, it can be a great comfort to them as they start to adjust to your home.
  • Cleaning Supplies. Accidents happen, and you want to make sure you’re prepared with cleaning supplies for those accidents.

There are over 75 million pet dogs in the United States, so there are many different pet stores that you can choose to get your supplies from. You can price check a few places online if you’re worried about getting the best price before you actually buy your supplies. If you know in advance when you’ll be picking up your pup, you have a bit more time to figure out

Look For Potential Hazards

Before you bring a dog home, you should make sure to scan any areas the dog will have access to for potential hazards to their safety. Things like small hair accessories, cleaning supplies, and wires or chargers can pose a threat if your new dog gets a hold of or chews on them. In addition, you should make sure that you thoroughly vacuum, mop, or sweep any area where you regularly have food to make sure that there aren’t any crumbs left behind for your new dog to get ahold of.

Think Through House Rules

Talk with anyone other adults in your household to set some ground rules for your new pet. Will you let the dog on the furniture? Where will the dog sleep? What will the walking or going out schedule be like? Make sure to discuss this before bringing your new dog home to avoid any conflict that you can.

Furniture can be an especially touchy subject since 95.1% of people agree that they expect their furniture to last many years, which can be cut short by damage due to a dog. Whether a dog’s nails rip at cloth furniture, they chew on the exposed chair legs, or rough playing causes the furniture to slam into walls or other pieces of furniture, it can be hard for you to protect all of your furniture around a dog, especially a puppy. Make sure that you know that damage may happen before you get a dog to avoid any issues between you and others in your household.

Get Ready For an Adjustment

Once your house is ready for your new dog, you should make sure that you’re ready as well. Some dogs will take weeks or even months to get fully settled into their new living situation, so you have to be prepared for some time to pass before your dog is comfortable around you and your home. Once they’re settled in, it will be like your dog has always been a part of your household, so make sure to hold out for them to settle in.

Are you getting a new dog soon? What are you excited or nervous about? Let us know in the comments!